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Bladder Cancer

See Also:
Bladder Cancer: Introduction & Pictures
Bladder Cancer: Types
Bladder Cancer: Causes & Risk Factors
Bladder Cancer: Signs & Symptoms
Bladder Cancer: Stages
Bladder Cancer: Medical Tests & Diagnosis
Bladder Cancer: Treatment Options
Cancer Search Engine!

Introduction, Statistics & Pictures

Bladder cancer is a form of cancer that develops in the lining of the bladder.

The bladder is a hollow, muscular, balloon-shaped organ with an elastic muscular wall that allows it to get larger or smaller. The bladder is located in the lower part of the abdomen (pelvis), and is part of the urinary system, the body's system that filters waste products out of the blood and makes urine. The bladder’s role is to store urine until it is ready to be eliminated from the body.

The bladder's internal structure is formed by four layers of tissue.

1. Transitional epithelium or urothelium: This is the innermost layer of tissue that forms a urine-proof membrane which stops the urine from being absorbed back into the body. The cells that form this first layer of tissue are called transitional cells or urothelial cells

2. Lamina propria: This is a thin layer of connective tissue located beneath transitional epithelium.

3. Muscularis propria: This is the layer of muscular tissue located underneath the lamina propria.

4. Fibrous adventitia: This is the outer layer of the bladder formed from connective tissues. This tissue layer separates the bladder from other organs within the pelvic area.

 

Bladder cancer begins in the cells. Normally, the cells grow and divide to produce new cells only when the body needs them. In some cases, this process is impaired and new cells form (the already existing cells divide uncontrollably) when the body does not need them, causing a tumor to form.

There are two types of tumors: benign (term that refers to a tissue growth which is not life threatening, because it does not spread damaging adjacent tissues, structures, and organs) and malignant (a term that refers to a cancerous mass or growth which can invade and destroy adjacent tissues and organs inside the body causing death).

Internationally, the incidence of bladder cancer varies substantially. The highest rate of bladder cancer is registered in Europe and North America. Bladder cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer in the U.S and UK. Each year, 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed and more than 14,680 die annually. Bladder cancer is more common among men than women. It is the 4th most common type of cancer diagnosed in men and the 11th most common type of cancer diagnosed in women. The 5 year survival rate is 79.3 percent.

Bladder cancer is successfully treated with minimal side effects if detected in the early stages. When the cancer is more advanced, it is difficult to treat and involves extensive procedures.

Bladder Cancer Pictures & Images

Cross-cut view of male urinary system

Cross-cut view of male urinary system.

Male Urinary System

From Top to Bottom: Adrenal Glands, Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder, Testis, Penis. (Urinary System) (Male)

Female Bladder

Female bladder in relation to body.

Female Bladder Cross-Cut view

Cross cut view showing female bladder, as well as other organs.

Bladder Tumor

Illustration of tumor growing inside of bladder.

cancer tumor : el cáncer de tumor : tumor de câncer : tumor de câncer : cancro tumore : cancer tumoare : tumeur cancéreuse : tumeur cancéreuse : kanser bukol : cancertumör

Artist rendering of a nonspecific tumor.

cancer tumor : el cáncer de tumor : tumor de câncer : tumor de câncer : cancro tumore : cancer tumoare : tumeur cancéreuse : tumeur cancéreuse : kanser bukol : cancertumör

Artist rendering of a nonspecific tumor.

Cancer Cell : las células cancerosas : células cancerosas : komórek nowotworowych : komórek nowotworowyc : cellule tumorali : celulele canceroase : les cellules cancéreuse : kanser cells : kankercellen : cancerceller

Three rendered Illustrations of how cancer cells appear. The lower right is an actual cancer cell under high-scale magnification.

 

See Also:
Bladder Cancer: Introduction & Pictures
Bladder Cancer: Types
Bladder Cancer: Causes & Risk Factors
Bladder Cancer: Signs & Symptoms
Bladder Cancer: Stages
Bladder Cancer: Medical Tests & Diagnosis
Bladder Cancer: Treatment Options
Cancer Search Engine!

Article by Alina Morrow, MS
Medical Writer
OmniMedicalSearch.com

Page Covers: What is bladder cancer?

 

Bladder Cancer Pictures & Images

Cross-cut view of male urinary system

Cross-cut view of male urinary system.

Male Urinary System

From Top to Bottom: Adrenal Glands, Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder, Testis, Penis. (Urinary System) (Male)

Female Bladder

Female bladder in relation to body.

Female Bladder Cross-Cut view

Cross cut view showing female bladder, as well as other organs.

Bladder Tumor

Illustration of tumor growing inside of bladder.

cancer tumor : el cáncer de tumor : tumor de câncer : tumor de câncer : cancro tumore : cancer tumoare : tumeur cancéreuse : tumeur cancéreuse : kanser bukol : cancertumör

Artist rendering of a nonspecific tumor.

cancer tumor : el cáncer de tumor : tumor de câncer : tumor de câncer : cancro tumore : cancer tumoare : tumeur cancéreuse : tumeur cancéreuse : kanser bukol : cancertumör

Artist rendering of a nonspecific tumor.

Cancer Cell : las células cancerosas : células cancerosas : komórek nowotworowych : komórek nowotworowyc : cellule tumorali : celulele canceroase : les cellules cancéreuse : kanser cells : kankercellen : cancerceller

Three rendered Illustrations of how cancer cells appear. The lower right is an actual cancer cell under high-scale magnification.

Bladder Cancer Pictures from our Medical Image Search Engine

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OmniMedicalSearch does not provide medical advice and the Medical Conditions & Diseases section is for informational purposes only. Please see our Medical Disclaimer and always consult with your physician.

 

Page Last Modified:
03/06/2011