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Vaginal Cancer

See Also:
Vaginal Cancer: Introduction & Pictures
Vaginal Cancer: Types
Vaginal Cancer: Causes & Risk Factors
Vaginal Cancer: Signs & Symptoms
Vaginal Cancer: Stages
Vaginal Cancer: Medical Tests & Diagnosis
Vaginal Cancer: Treatment Options
Vaginal Cancer: Prevention Tips
Cancer Search Engine

Introduction & Pictures

Vaginal cancer is a rare gynecological cancer where malignant (cancerous) tissue develops within the vagina.

The vagina is a tubular tract which connects the cervix (the lower, narrow part of the uterus) to the vulva (external genitalia). This elastic muscular canal vary in length between 3 to 4 inch (7,5 to 10 cm) and can stretch (because of its anatomical structure) during sexual intercourse or birth. Also, menstrual fluid leaves the body every month during menstrual period through vagina.

The vaginal walls contain two main layers of tissue. The first layer, called epithelium, lines the vagina’s walls and contains squamous epithelial cells. Beneath this tissue (the epithelium), lays the second major layer, called connective tissue layer, which contains connective and involuntary muscle tissue, lymph vessels, and nerves.

Normally, the vaginal cells grow and divide to form new cells, and when they get old, they die, allowing new cells to take their place. When this process is impaired, the cells start to divide and grow abnormally, the old cells do not die when they should, and the result is an abnormal tissue mass or tumor.

There are two types of tumors: benign (term that refers to a non-cancerous mass or growth which is not life threatening, because it does not spread damaging adjacent tissues, structures, and organs) and malignant (term that refers to a cancerous mass or growth which can invade and destroy adjacent tissues and organs inside the body causing death).

Vaginal cancer represents 2 to 3 percent of all female reproductive system cancers. Usually, it tends to be a secondary cancer. This means that cancerous cells migrate and invade the vagina from other organs, such as the cervix or vulva. However, diagnosed in early stages, it can be treated effectively.

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See Also:
Vaginal Cancer: Introduction & Pictures
Vaginal Cancer: Types
Vaginal Cancer: Causes & Risk Factors
Vaginal Cancer: Signs & Symptoms
Vaginal Cancer: Stages
Vaginal Cancer: Medical Tests & Diagnosis
Vaginal Cancer: Treatment Options
Vaginal Cancer: Prevention Tips
Cancer Search Engine

Article by Alina Morrow, MS
Medical Writer
OmniMedicalSearch.com

 

 

Illustration of female anatomy.

Diagram of female anatomy.

cancer tumor : el cáncer de tumor : tumor de câncer : tumor de câncer : cancro tumore : cancer tumoare : tumeur cancéreuse : tumeur cancéreuse : kanser bukol : cancertumör

Artist rendering of a nonspecific tumor.

cancer tumor : el cáncer de tumor : tumor de câncer : tumor de câncer : cancro tumore : cancer tumoare : tumeur cancéreuse : tumeur cancéreuse : kanser bukol : cancertumör

Artist rendering of a nonspecific tumor.

Cancer Cell : las células cancerosas : células cancerosas : komórek nowotworowych : komórek nowotworowyc : cellule tumorali : celulele canceroase : les cellules cancéreuse : kanser cells : kankercellen : cancerceller

Three rendered Illustrations of how cancer cells appear. The lower right is an actual cancer cell under high-scale magnification.

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Page Last Modified:
12/17/2010